5 Myths About Online Security You Should Care About

Online-Security-Tips
Courtesy: computerhowtoguide.com

Everyday users are becoming more savvy about Internet security and antivirus software. There are still plenty of users that don’t realize how their activities make their confidential data vulnerable to cyber-criminals.

According to Trend Micro’s 2013 Q2 Threat Roundup report:
  •  In the first six months of 2013, 350,000 high risk and malicious apps were uncovered.
  • The majority of these high risk apps are spoofed or “Trojanized” versions of popular mobile applications.
  • 146K online banking infections were reported in the second quarter of 2013 included 146K online banking infections.
  • English is the language of choice for spam in an attempt to reach global users.


5 Myths About Online Security You Should Care About- 

5. MYTH: I’m a Mac user, so I don’t have to worry about security issues

With more people using Macs, reported attacks from Mac users are on the rise. Even Mac users should invest in a data theft software program.

4. MYTH: If my browser displays a locked padlock, the website is secure

Not all browsers display the locked-padlock security symbol. The bad guys have figured out how to reproduce that trusted security symbol. So, if you’re suspicious about the site — don’t trust it!

3.MYTH: It’s okay to view potentially infected email without clicking on any attachments or links

If you think an email is spam or a scam, proceed with caution and Do Not Open. Email attacks can happen even after the message is only opened — clicking links and opening attachments are not necessary. 

2. My password is secure

Most passwords are not very secure, but rather predictable including birthdays, home addresses, and children’s names. To create a secure password, identify a lengthy passphrase that includes punctuation marks, letters and numbers.

1. I will know when my computer is infected

People believe they know the signs of an infected computer: it runs more slowly, annoying pop-up ads appear or your machine crashes. Unfortunately viruses can infiltrate your computer and your computer may show none of these warning signs. Invest in a good anti-virus security program and proceed with caution.

Written by:

Noah Gamer is a driven business leader with experience in Internet marketing, Web software development and eCommerce. Currently, he develops security strategies for Trend Micro.